Teaching Quality

Looking at the determinants of quality, pupil classroom ratios in primary and secondary schools is generally improving from what is obtained when the 2009 to 2018 ESP was produced. This improvement in the classroom pupil ratio may not be unconnected with the massive investment in construction of one storey duplex blocks of classroom from 2011 to 2015. This assisted in decongestion policy in pre-primary and primary schools in the state. However, Ratio of pupils in classrooms are reduced from 112 pupils to a class (State EMIS data 2016/2017) to the present 100 pupils to a class (Kano State ASC report 2016/2017). In the same vein the student classroom ratio The state of school infrastructure is one of important factors in the improvement of teaching and learning. Table 4 below is pupil’s classroom ratio by LGA in Kano State. (Kano State ASC Report 2016/2017).

Table 4 Pupil-classroom ratio by school type and LGA

LGA

Public

Private

Pre-primary and Primary

Junior Secondary

Sci. & Tech Secondary

Senior  Secondary

All levels

AJINGI

116

41

0

22

0

ALBASU

83

49

25

29

20

BAGWAI

89

40

0

36

33

BEBEJI

83

50

110

34

12

BICHI

121

44

67

32

27

BUNKURE

114

48

0

34

0

DALA

84

87

0

65

29

DAMBATTA

101

38

65

28

0

DAWAKIN KUDU

124

57

53

40

57

DAWAKIN TOFA

92

59

57

37

48

DOGUWA

133

37

43

19

40

FAGGE

99

78

0

73

19

GABASAWA

122

52

39

45

0

GARKO

90

75

47

52

0

GARUM MALLAM

100

48

0

34

0

GAYA

98

50

50

32

21

GEZAWA

114

65

24

39

26

GWALE

64

82

0

76

34

GWARZO

101

49

0

43

44

KABO

102

52

24

44

52

KANO MUNICIPAL

65

57

0

55

29

KARAYE

153

45

63

52

44

KIBIYA

69

44

0

27

0

KIRU

118

55

0

50

34

KUMBOTSO

122

70

65

60

19

KUNCHI

89

26

22

23

67

KURA

94

70

0

49

49

MADOBI

89

49

0

36

35

MAKODA

102

24

33

25

41

MINJIBIR

89

40

46

36

63

NASSARAWA

103

89

284

64

26

RANO

74

50

66

38

27

RIMIN GADO

87

39

0

52

0

ROGO

132

55

55

45

36

SHANONO

107

43

0

48

20

SUMAILA

94

56

15

56

0

TAKAI

105

48

48

36

0

TARAUNI

87

66

0

67

30

TOFA

87

42

24

31

0

TSANYAWA

100

48

0

28

30

TUDUN WADA

136

54

0

44

56

UNGONGO

133

77

0

46

26

WARAWA

108

38

0

19

0

WUDIL

83

84

51

71

30

TOTAL

100

58

69

47

28

The table above shows that the pupil-classroom ratio for public Pre-primary and Primary schools stood at 100. This implies an average of 100 pupils to one classroom in public Pre-primary and Primary schools. Similarly, the pupil-classroom ratio of JSS reported that there are 55 students in one classroom. However, going by the National Policy the ratio for both Pre – Primary and JSS Public Schools need to be a bridge by providing more classrooms to meet up the standard of 1: 45 or 50. The ranked pupil-classroom ratio for public Pre-Primary schools is depicted in the figure below.

Figure 261: Public Pre-Primary/Primary Schools Ranked Pupil-Classroom Ratio

From the above Graph Karaye has the highest pupils Classroom Ratio of One Classroom per One Hundred and Fifty Three Pupil in Pre – Primary and Primary Schools (1:135) and Gwale has the lowest Pupils Classroom Ratio of One Classroom per Sixty Four Pupils (1:64)

However, in JSS School the chart below describes that Nassarawa has the highest Students Classroom Ratio with One Classroom per One Hundred and Eighty Nine Student (1:89)  and Makoda with lowest ratio of One Classroom Per Twenty Four Student (1:24)

Figure 27: Public JSS Ranked Pupil-Classroom Ratio

The ranked pupil-classroom ratio for public JSS is depicted in the figure below.

Figure 28: Public SSS Ranked Pupil-Classroom Ratio

 

The above graph display the situation of Classrooms and the benefitting students in Senior Secondary Schools which clearly shows  Gwale has the highest Students Classroom Ratio of  One Classroom per Seventy Six Student (1:76) whereas Doguwa and Warawa has the lowest Student Classroom Ratio of One Classroom per 19 Students (1:19)

Table 5: Infrastructure and teaching and learning indicator for public schools in Kano, 2016/2017

 

Primary

JSS

SSS

Pupil classroom ratio

100

58

47

 

 

 

 

Source: Kano State ASC Report 2016/2017

Of great importance in determining the quality of education are the number, competence, motivation and use of teachers in the education system. Table 6 shows that public pupil teacher ratios across the three level of  education system has improved from the position it was in 2007. Female teachers at the primary level make up only 24% of the teaching force which is well below the SSA average of 45% (UNESCO 2006). Average public pupil teacher ratios in SSA at the junior and senior secondary levels were 30 and 22 respectively and are lower than those found in Kano (see Table 6).

Table 6: Indicators on teachers in Kano, 2016/2017

 

Public

Private

 

Primary

JSS

SSS

PRI.&SEC

Number of teachers

40,053

8,542

6,665

17,899

Pupil teacher ratio

72

42

33

15

Pupil qualified teacher ratio

134

55

41

20

Source: Kano State ASC Report 2015/2016

 

Similarly, the current teacher work force in public schools at primary sector in the state clearly shows that the teachers currently teaching in the public education system in Kano 54% are qualified, while reported 77% in JSS and 80% in Senior Secondary School. This shows a vast improvement over the situation in 2007 where only 23% are qualified. This increase is connected to the in-service training programme and the employment policy of the government over the years from 2007 to date.

Subject specialization is one aspect of teacher training that has an important impact on the ability of qualified teachers to teach in primary schools. Only a sizeable number of qualified teachers choose to qualify as general primary school teachers (i.e. Primary Education Studies), but instead, choose a subject specialisation. This is generally because, the NCE education received on graduation allows teachers to teach in both primary and secondary schools. Choosing the general primary course, would deny  college students the chance of  teaching in secondary schools where the pay is often better, social status higher and promotion from one grade level to the other is prompt and easy.