Component 1:- Promoting school effectiveness and improved learning outcomes

Component 1: Promoting School Effectiveness and Improved Learning Outcomes ($42.00million)

The main objective of this component is to improvethe effectiveness of schools in enabling pupils to enroll, stay in school and improve learning outcomes, by promoting school-level resourcing and planning, providing increased resources for primary and pre-primary education and providing increased resources for initiatives that target improved teaching and learning outcomes in reading, literacy and numeracy especially in the early primary grades. This component will have 3 sub-components:

 

Sub-Component 1a: School Improvement Grants to Primary Schools (US $23.51 million)

This sub-component provides support to Public Primary schools including integrated Islamiyya[1] schools in the participating states by funding non-salary expenditures, for improving school effectiveness, learning and teaching. To be eligible for a school grant, the school must fulfil the following criteria:

a)Established a functioning SBMC;

  1. b) Received SBMC training on schools grants;
  2. c) Developed School Development Plan (SDP); and
  3. d) Established a bank account.

The eligible expenditures for funding under this subcomponent are those initiatives that can aid access, retention of pupils and improve learning outcomes in school. These may include:

  • School uniforms,
  • Learning materials (textbooks, exercise books, writing materials, ICT materials etc.).
  • Classroom materials (chalk/marker boards, BB ruler, Duster etc.).
  • Performance incentives (bicycles, pupils’ readers etc.).
  • Minor rehabilitation (renovations of black boards/, classroom furniture, toilets, open well etc.).
  • support to remedial education such as payment of allowances for community/contract.
  • Teachers who provide coverage in hard-to-staff areas such as literacy and numeracy.
  • school-level quality initiatives that draw on community support such as reading.
  • campaigns.
  • implementation of the communications strategy, and other operating costs and contingencies (e.g. administration and management costs as well as monitoring and supervision visits)3
  • Training on school-based  management  areas  including  managing  resources.
  • monitoring schools, supporting teaching and learning, and addressing the issues of concern to the girl-child.

Integrated Islamiyya Schools are type of schools with modernized schooling systems implementing Integrated Qur’anic Teaching and Education (IQTE). They teach Islamic curriculum and have accepted to integrate elements of basic education into their schools through the core subjects (English, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Basic Science).  These category of schools receive incentives and support from Government agencies, particularly SUBEBs to integrate the core subjects.

Table 2.2: Number of Primary Schools to benefit from SIG Annually.

Years

Annual Primary schools benefiting from SIG

Kano

2015

1160

2016

280

2017

300

2018

822

Total

2562

Key results will include:

  • increase in Pupils enrollment and attendance
  • Gender Parity (Primary Enrollment)
  • improved learning outcomes measured by learning assessments

Hausa Literacy Rate of Primary 2 & 3 pupils as measured by Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA)

English Literacy rate of Primary 3 pupils as measured by EGRA

  • increase in the number of eligible schools for SIG each year
  • re-eligibility for the subsequent year based on a successful audit of the SBMC’s reports and 80% execution on activities set out in the SIP

Sub-Component 1b: School Improvement Grants to Public Pre-Primary Public Schools including integrated Islamiyya schools (US $7.65 million)

This sub-component will provide grants to public pre-primary schools and integrated Islamiyyah that already have pre-primary classrooms and meet the SIGs eligibility criteria set in the School Grants Manual Section of this Manual.

To be eligible under this sub-component, the school must fulfil the following criteria:

  • Established a functioning Public Pre-Primary School
  • Established a functioning SBMC;
  • Received training on fund management and utilization of school grants;
  • Developed School Improvement Plan (SIP); and
  • Established a functioning bank account.
  • Established a functioning IECDCC at school level

The eligible expenditures for funding under this subcomponent are those initiatives that can aid access, retention of pupils and improve learning outcomes in school. These may include:

  • Pupils’ materials to support access and retention such as uniforms, shoes, book, bags,free feeding, etc.
  • Classroom materials including relevant toys and posters (locally sourced toys and classroom materials)
  • Training of teachers and caregivers including the costs of caregivers from the community (as prioritized in the SIP),
  • Parent and guardian engagement and education to promote enrolment in pre-primary school.
  • Minor rehabilitation such as (renovations/purchase of) Chalk/Marker boards, classroom furniture, toilets, Tricycles, etc.
  • implementation of the communications strategy, and other operating costs and contingencies (e.g. administration and management costs as well as monitoring and supervision visits)
  • Training on school-based management areas including managing resources, monitoring schools, supporting teaching and learning, and addressing the issues of concern to the girl-child
  • sensitization of local communities and schools on the availability of grant funds
  • workshops and capacity development opportunities to support potentially eligible schools’ grant applications
  • in-service professional development training for pre-primary professionals
  • training programs developed and provided with the assistance of local colleges of education, universities and/or national teacher’s institute
    • training will focus on ECD pedagogy, and practical steps for implementing the instructional manual and national pre-primary curriculum

Table 3.3: Number of Pre-Primary Schools to benefit from SIG Annually.

Years

Annual Pre – Primary schools benefiting from SIG

Kano

2015

250

2016

784

2017

896

2018

640

Total

2570

Key results will include:

  1. Increased access to pre-primary education
  2. Increased pre-primary enrollment and transition to primary education especially for girls and children with special needs
  • improved teacher content knowledge and pedagogy on pre-primary/early childhood education
  1. increased level of understanding and appreciation of pre-primary/early childhood education by parents and caregivers
  2. Improved management of pre-primary schools by NIPEP SPTCs in collaboration with the relevant departments at SUBEB and LGEAs.
  3. increase in the number of eligible schools for pre-primary SIG each year
  • re-eligibility for the subsequent year based on a successful audit of the SBMC’s reports and 80% execution on activities set out in the SIP

 

Sub-Component 1c: Support to Teacher Professional Development (US $14.8 million)

This sub-component will provide funds to support the costs of training and materials in state-led initiatives[1] such as:

  • The development of skills of primary schools teachers
  • mentor teachers and head teachers in core areas of reading, literacy, and mathematics
  • support to head teachers to improve their skills and abilities on leadership and school management
  • ongoing professional development and coaching/mentoring support from dedicated school support officers at local government level as well as roles being played by head teachers and peers through lesson observation and opportunities to reflect at school and Project level[2]

 

The sub-component will also provide funds to enable an expansion and institutionalization of continuing professional development such as:

  • improving teachers’ professional knowledge, classroom instruction and assessment skills to help children learn better
  • the development or revision of materials (drawing on existing initiatives) and the necessary meetings and workshops at the LGA level
  • the revision and provision of materials (including printing) to support teachers such as teacher guides, lesson plans, and instructional materials
  • the costs associated with holding meetings at school and LGA level including transport and allowance costs for trainers and coaches from local government level and overall Master Trainers from state level
  • an expansion of the cadre of Master Trainers and teacher facilitators to enable more teachers and schools to benefit more from the program, by enabling more support/coaching observations and visits to teachers in their classrooms
  • teacher selection based on a number of criteria: to have the responsibility for teaching the relevant grade in Hausa, English literacy or numeracy and the capacity to learn and develop
  • benefit teaching and learning improvements in the later years of primary where possible, although priority will be given to early primary teachers
  • teacher development initiatives, including materials, which are seen to have potential in one state, to be replicated in other NIPEP states

development of skills for pupils assessment in professional training

[1] These are state-led initiatives that already have IDP technical support and government backing, including federal intervention (UBEC Teacher Professional Development) and state funds

[2] Learning Achievement: Engaging with Evidence- A working evidence paper –version 1, UKAid/ DFID, March 2014; Education Rigorous Literature Review: Pedagogy, Curriculum, Teaching Practices and Teacher Education in Developing Countries, Westbrook et al December 2013; as cited in the NIPEP Program Application Document (PAD), September 2014

Table 4.4: Proposed Number of Teachers to be Trained.

Years

Annual Primary schools benefiting from SIG

Kano

2015

15000

2016

13255

2017

10000

2018

6000

Total

44255

Key results will include:

  • increased percentage of teachers who have access to professional training (English/Arabic Medium) and developmental programs
  • increased percentage of head teachers who have access to professional (English/Arabic Medium) training and developmental programs on leadership and school management
  • improved reading, literacy, and numeracy skills in Pupils through assessment results
  • increased number of children who are able to learn to read in Hausa at early grades
  • increased number/percentage of teachers who can effectively use Hausa Language for improved instruction in primary school
  • increased number of teachers and head teachers who meet prescribed professional competency criteria